'The Flow' Blog - Movement is your Medicine
What do we Know about Food?
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What do we know about food?

Column #11, 3rd February 2007

In our holistic approach to optimum health, nutrition is key. Most of us now appreciate that as well as exercising regularly, we need to eat the right foods. Over the next few fortnightly issues, we will investigate what we need to know about the food we eat. Why organic? What is Metabolic Typing? What resources are out there?

Nutrition is a truly vast topic and it can be controversial. Getting to the bottom of it can be the answer to your ailments, aches and pains and performance problems. Here are just some interesting points that, for me, highlight the value of finding out about the food that we should eat:

Why has saturated fat got such a bad name? Although it has received a lot of bad press recently, saturated fat is an important nutrient that we all need to function. Saturated fat has been the primary dietary source for many of our ancestors and the research shows that related problems today such as heart disease and obesity are more likely to be linked to consumption of processed fats and sugar.

The exceptionally nutritious coconut. The Coconut helps prevent and fight against disease and is a great source of protein and saturated fat. When digested, it is quickly absorbed so there is less strain on our systems and it is used as energy quickly, as opposed to being stored as body fat. In addition, it is valuable to those who are gluten intolerant as coconut flour can be used in recipes, without the presence of wheat or grains.

Evolution and the grain. Our awareness of the impact that grains can have on our health is growing. Those with conditions like gluten intolerance and Coeliac disease will not do well on grains like wheat. In fact, most of us may benefit from vastly reducing our grain (and sugars) intake and we would be likely to see weight loss. The problem has arisen because as humans, our digestive system is still catching up, in evolutionary terms, with the increasing presence that grains and especially processed flour have in our diet.

Nutritional individuality. It’s time that we considered ourselves as individuals in our nutritional requirements, in the same way we do in nearly all other areas. We are all different shapes and sizes and have different energy levels and it seems only natural that our bodies will require different nutrients to be successful. A given amount and combination of nutrients could be exactly what one person needs, whilst it could actually be detrimental to the next. Quite an important concept when we consider that we’ve been advised that one size does fit all for most of our life.

 
How Nutrition is Key to Health
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How nutrition is key to optimum Health

Column #10, 20th January 2007

As part of a holistic approach to optimum health, nutrition is key. We must appreciate that all the systems within the body (muscular, skeletal, digestive etc) are linked and that they will all affect each other.

Therefore, if you are looking to:

  • Reach your ideal weight
  • Improve body shape
  • Increase energy levels
  • Enhance awareness
  • Boost concentration levels
  • Become stronger
  • Stay injury free
  • Be happier and healthier

…..then you must focus on your physical fitness and nutrition.

Each fortnight we will focus on nutrition and investigate why it is that despite all the information and focus on nutrition and healthy eating, so many people struggle to achieve the desired results.

Maintaining correct nutrition

From my experience there are a number of factors that thwart attempts to consume the correct types and amounts of nutrients. This could be anything from the practicalities of not having enough time to prepare food and financial restraints to not knowing what type of food our own body requires to be successful at its many jobs.

It is important to consider what stage you are at now and make steady changes. The last thing we want is for you to see this as a chore. Already, eating is something that is squeezed into the daily routine, but it should be a thoughtful and enjoyable process. Eating in a rush can elicit a stress response, which can lead to digestion problems.

The benefits of maintaining correct nutrition

By making the correct food choices, investing in the quality of food, preparing fresh meals and eating comfortably and adequately throughout the day, you will see great changes in your health and vitality. No more cravings for sweet food, tiredness following meals and digestive dysfunction. Greater energy levels, clarity of thinking, concentration levels, sporting performance and body composition.

Back to Organics?

I always encourage consumption of organic food. Despite clear benefits to regional producers, it will significantly enhance your well-being. Consider what the digestive system is designed to work with: fresh, unpolluted, seasonal food. Now think about what you may be consuming and asking it to deal with. With correct nutrition and a manageable exercise routine you can achieve great success.

What is Metabolic Typing?

What if you are already making a lot of healthy choices, but are failing to see and feel the results? This is actually quite a common occurrence. The key to anybody’s nutritional success is to provide the body with what it wants and what it can work successfully with. This varies from person to person and is known as metabolic typing and will be discussed in forthcoming articles.

Remember, your body is a system of systems that all need to work efficiently and all will have an affect on each other. The sum of their effectiveness is the level of health that you will enjoy. During the coming weeks we will review fad diets, organic food and metabolic typing further.

 

 

 
BMC Climbing Injuries Symposium - November 2010
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A weekend of Fantastic speakers and presentations.  Thanks to the BMC for organising the first of many.

Highlights for me were:

  • Dave Binney's model of young climber development.  Really appreciating the importance of the fundamental skills and the need to accommodate Biological age, not chronological.
  • Volker Schoeffl's insight into specific hand, finger and shoulder injuries.  Learned a lot of great stuff.
  • Alison MacFarlane's talk on Sports Physiotherapy and Climbing.  I really appreciated the focus on movement screening and individual assessment in order to be preventative.  Alison's approach was to view the body as an integrated kinetic chain and highlighted that the site of pain might not actually be where the problem is coming from.
 
Northern Rock Cyclone Event - Cycling Conditioning and Preparation
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Northern Rock Cyclone Event - Cycling Conditioning and Preparation

Column #93, 22nd May 2010

Hot on last year’s success once again the region is getting into gear for the Northern Rock Cyclone 2010.  A fantastic family and competitive event for all levels of abilities over a weekend in June.  Now is a good time to share some tips on conditioning for cycling and where to get the best support in the North East.

2010 Northern Rock Cyclone Event

In its 4th year this event is firmly on the North East sporting calendar.   June  11th-13th 2010's event is set to be one of the UK’s biggest and most successful participatory cycling festivals.  Sponsored by Northern Rock, the Cyclone offers opportunities for people of all ages and abilities to compete in this highly popular event (3000 spectators), as well as raising over £150,000 for North East charities.

Cycling Conditioning

The event is a health initiative and whether you are a keen cyclist, enjoy it recreationally, taking part with the whole family or are purely raising money for charity, it is important that you take the right steps to develop your fitness for the bike and its specific demands on the body.

The Demands of Cycling

Although cycling varies in its duration, intensity and terrain, the physical demands typically focus on:

  • Cardiovascular and Muscular Endurance.
  • Power
  • Balance and Stability.
  • A cyclic motion of the legs.
  • Posturally, aflexed and held position for the upper body.

Whilst there are many health and fitness benefits to this exercise, this position and action is somewhat different to what the body is accustomed to.  This is important for a number of reasons, including your posture, generation of power and injury prevention.

Getting Started

For some of us, getting the bike out the garage and servicing it will be the first step.   If so  this weekend is a good time to do so.  Ideally  book it in for a service.  Next step is to ensure the bike is set up for you, as posture is so important when cycling.  If you aren't set up and for example your seat is in the wrong position relative to your brake height, this could eventually affect your stability on the bike and therefore your power output.  Basically, the ride will be harder than it needs to be and you are risking injury.  So get expert advice.

Northern Integrative Health Practice

That’s the bike sorted, now what about you.  Whether you are taking part in the 33mile, 63mile or 104miler on the Saturday you will ideally be in good physical condition.  The best  way to ensure this is to get assessed by the Exercise and Strength Coaches at the ‘Northern Integrative health Practice’ in Sacriston, County Durham.  Here you will receive comprehensive screening for posture, core, flexibility and functional movement.  Call 0191 3980000 to book your Assessment today.

At the NIHP all your needs are catered for.  Whether a novice or professional competing in the Sunday Beaumont Trophy Race (2009 winner – Bradley Wiggins), you may want to prepare for the cycling weekend with a sports massage, physiotherapy for injury management or acupuncture for pain and function. See www.healthnorth.co.uk for more info.

For Cyclone event information go to www.northernrockcyclone.co.uk. June is soon and is a definite date for the family diary.

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Northern Rock Cyclone Event - Cycling and Core Conditioning
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Northern Rock Cyclone Event - Cycling and Core Conditioning

Column #94, 5th June 2010

June  11th-13th 2010's event is set to be one of the UK’s biggest and most successful participatory cycling festivals. A great deal of thought has gone into organising a weekend that will be enjoyable and challenging for cyclists of all ages and abilities.  Whether you are an elite athlete or out with the whole family, here are a few tips to get yourself in the best shape.

Expert Advice

As a strength coach to elite and recreational  athletes I’ve witnessed first hand the importance of preparing for an event and conditioning for the demands of your sport.  Before we get on the saddle and cycle for several hours, its essential that we have considered factors such as postural influences, flexibility, muscle balance, strength, core strength and endurance.  Especially important if we are challenging ourselves on one of Saturday’s 33, 63 or 104miler circuits.

My advice would be to first get an assessment with somebody who can give you feedback on:

  • Posture: static and dynamic, spinal curvatures and pelvic angles.
  • Functional Movement Screening.
  • Muscle Balance including strength and flexibility.
  • Core Function.
  • Injury Management and Prevention.

Of course I’d recommend visiting the ‘Northern Integrative Health Practice’ and working with the Strength and Exercise Coaches and other practitioners such as Acupuncturists, Physiotherapists and Bowen Technique therapists.  Call 0191 3980000 to book your Assessment today www.healthnorth.co.uk.

Condition your Core for More

Today we’ll focus on a hugely neglected area of fitness, even in elite cyclists and athletes.  The core.  Now, before you cry out ‘fad, craze, buzz trend’ and ‘just another fitness industry gimmick’…… I agree.  However the problem is with the health and fitness industry and not the science behind why we need to condition our core.  The message and information gets lost somewhere along the line when the sole purpose is selling products and increasing membership sales.

The fact remains though, that for many reasons our abdominal wall can be dysfunctional, whether that be due to pain, injury, inflammation, poor diet, stress, disease, poor exercise technique or otherwise.  When the abdominal wall is dysfunctional the body will compensate in the effort to protect the body or still get the job done.  This means that if the job is to pick up something heavy at home, lift weights in the gym, or indeed perform a challenging cycle ride, the body will find a way to achieve it.  Whilst this is an amazing ability of the body, what I observe in the gym and in the clinic is that in the long run this causes muscle imbalance and postural changes and potentially pain (typically joint and lowback pain).

Rebuild the Abdominal Wall

We all want to be active and to be able to enjoy all the activities and demands that life throws at us.  One of the keys to staying healthy and pain free is to get educated about the way we move and this includes the function of our core, deep abdominals, inner unit, whichever you choose to call it.  It is my advice that you get educated on it, seek expert advice and develop a considered training plan.  You can read more indepth articles on the JournalLive website, or click the link below.

All in the name of having a great time at the Northern Cyclone Event.  For more event information go to www.northernrockcyclone.co.uk. This is a definite date for the family diary.

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Golf: From Crazy to Elite
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Golf:  From Crazy to Elite

Column #50, 16th August 2008

The domination of Tiger Woods in the world of Golf has highlighted the importance of strength and conditioning.  Players have been able to embrace it as part of their training and reach greater performance levels.  Whether you are looking to seriously enhance your own performance or make the step up from the rigours of crazy golf there are several factors you should consider.  A fun and easy way to get started is at the Northern Rock Golf Festival.

Achieve Function

To truly excel at any sport and to prevent injury from an activity you enjoy doing, it is important that you have a clean functional profile.  This means that you are free of muscle imbalance, have correct levels of mobility in your joints, have good posture and unrestricted movement patterns.  There are plenty of well-qualified practitioners that will be able to assess and design you a program.

Mobility

For golf it is essential that you have a good range of motion.  For example, if you cannot rotate efficiently you will no doubt compensate, developing a faulty swing and cause an injury.

Posture

There is a specific postural position for golf, which is required for correct swing mechanics.  Furthermore, posture must be maintained through dynamic movements.  Only then will you be able to consistently improve factors such as clubface alignment and clubhead speed.

Grove the Movement

When you can produce the correct positions and movements, you need to engrain them.  They must be ‘laid down’ in the body and become natural.  If you practise with poor form, your body will learn poor form.  Groove the movement to ensure accuracy and then work on the distance.

Develop Strength and Power

Golf certainly requires strength to play to high standards and avoid injury.  Once you have achieved muscle balance, mobility, posture and movement, you should then develop strength.

On this foundation you can then build Power.

Fore!

How do you know whether your training and conditioning has gone a bit wayward?  Well, your body lets you know and so does your handicap progress.  It could be a postural issue, technique or an imbalance brought about by any number of things.  A good way to ensure continued development of your game is to apply the aforementioned steps, ideally with the help of a specifically trained CHEK Institute Golf Biomechanic (www.chekinstitute.com).

Northern Rock Golf Festival – ‘The Rock’

If you’re looking for a way to get more involved the Northern Rock Golf Festival at Matfen Hall Northumberland on Sunday 24th August is a great opportunity.  The ‘Rock’ recognise Golf’s health benefits and the festival is aimed at giving kids from across the North East an opportunity to try golf, improve their skills or play in a tournament, as well as being a great day out for all of the family (PGA North Region on Tel: 01204 496137).

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New Year, All Year
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New Year, All Year?

Column #60, 3rd January 2009

Making a resolution is a form of making a change and could theoretically be done any time of the year, but as tradition dictates, right now is the most popular time to do so. ‘New Year All Year’ is not the same sentiment as ‘wishing it was Christmas everyday’. It’s about finding something that is successful and sustainable. In other words, it works.

Steps in the right direction

You may be beginning an exercise programme or changing your exercise and lifestyle habits. Making the small steps will truly lead to your success if you can sustain them. Typically and unfortunately our good intensions seem not to last. This is often due to; not getting the desired results, injury, lack of enjoyment and importantly, the irrelevance of the exercise programme to the function of the individual.  Here are 10 tips to making sustainable changes that work to achieve your goals:

  1. Prioritise areas of your health that need addressing. Work with ‘Functional Trainer’ to address nutrition, exercise, movement, performance or rehabilitation.
  2. Time Investment: Decide on a realistic amount of time you can dedicate to your training. Everybody is different, so take manageable steps in the right direction.
  3. Initial Over Training: Too much training at the beginning could lead to injury, fatigue, immune system suppression and boredom.
  4. Functional Training: You must train for the purpose of performing the activities in your daily life free from injury and ill health. This could include DIY, carrying heavy bags, manual labour or sport.
  5. Correct your Posture: Poor posture can lead to aches, pains, injuries and dysfunction. Poor spinal alignment can even cause digestive dysfunction, so make sure you always consider your posture during movement and exercise. Have your posture assessed accurately.
  6. Learning about you: Never follow generic, one-size-fits-all programmes. When we can’t see why we are doing something, it will often impair our interest and enjoyment of it. Know why you are performing any of the changes you make to your lifestyle.
  7. Avoid Fad/Extreme Diets because you will not be supplying your body with the required nutrients, any results will be short lived and you may even cause damage to your body.
  8. Metabolic Typing Diet: Find out your metabolic type and eat accordingly. This will enable you to attain and maintain your ideal body weight and improve your health. This is not an extreme diet and is based on the scientific principle that as individuals we have specific nutritional requirements.
  9. Eat Organic, fresh and local: Organic food is free of pesticides, herbicides, fungicides and fertilizers, which can cause damage and infections in your digestive system
  10. Quality: However frequently you exercise, make sure it is quality. If you exercise with poor technique your body will learn it that way, causing problems like reduced performance, injury and poor posture.

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All Year Resolutions
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All Year Resolutions

Column #9, 7th January 2007

Over the last few months we have considered many factors that impact on our health.  It can be hard to decide where and even when to begin.  For a lot of people that decisive moment will be here, in the form of New Year’s Resolutions.  But, just how do you sustain the concept for the rest of 2007 and beyond?

Drop-Off: You may be beginning an exercise program or changing your exercise and lifestyle habits.  All too often the good intentions shown are not sustained for one reason or another.  Typically, this is due to not getting the desired results, getting injured, lack of enjoyment and importantly, the irrelevance of the exercise program to the function of the individual.

Here are a few tips on succeeding in beginning, reaching and sustaining your optimum health in 2007 and beyond:

  1. Prioritise areas of your health that need addressing.  This could be diet, exercise, sports training, or rehabilitation.  Your program should be specific to you.
  2. Time Investment: Decide on a realistic amount of time you can dedicate to your training.  Everybody is different.  Just take manageable steps in the right direction.
  3. Initial Over Training: Too much training at the beginning could lead to injury, fatigue, immune system suppression and boredom.  You need to be able to sustain these changes long term and you can always progress in the future.
  4. Train Functionally:  You must train for the purpose of performing the activities in your daily life free from injury and ill health.  This could include DIY, carrying heavy bags, manual labour or sport.  Therefore, most of your exercises will be Total Body exercises.
  5. Correct your Posture: Poor posture can lead to aches, pains, injuries and dysfunction.  Poor spinal alignment can even cause digestive dysfunction, so make sure you always consider your posture during movement and exercise.
  6. Learning about you:  When we can’t see why we are doing something, it will often impair our interest and enjoyment of it.  Know why you are performing any of the changes you make to your lifestyle.  Try not to follow generic, one-size-fits-all programs.
  7. Avoid Fad/Extreme Diets because you will not be supplying your body with the required nutrients, any results will be short lived and you may even cause damage to your body.
  8. Metabolic Typing Diet:  Find out your metabolic type and eat accordingly.  This will enable you to attain and maintain your ideal body weight and cure many ailments.  This is not an extreme diet and is based on the scientific principle that as individuals we have specific nutritional requirements.
  9. Eat Organic: Organic food is free of pesticides, herbicides, fungicides and fertilizers, which cause damage and infections in your digestive system
  10. Quality: However frequently you exercise, make sure it is quality.  If you exercise with poor technique your body will learn it that way, causing problems like reduced performance, injury and poor posture.

Good luck with any changes that you make and remember to consult your physician and an exercise specialist for advice.

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Cycling Conditioning
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Cycling Conditioning

Column #45, 7th June 2008

As the region gets into gear for the Northern Rock Cyclone 2008 event I think it’s a good time to share some tips on conditioning for cycling.

Whether you are a keen cyclist or enjoy it recreationally you will make performance gains and benefit from taking the right steps to developing your fitness for the bike and its specific demands on the body.

The Demands of Cycling?

Although cycling varies in its duration, intensity and terrain, the physical demands typically focus on:

  • Endurance, power and balance.
  • A cyclic motion of the legs.
  • A flexed and held position for the upper body.

Whilst there are many health and fitness benefits to this exercise, this position and action is somewhat different to what the body is accustomed to.  This is important for a number of reasons, including your posture, generation of power and injury prevention.

Endurance Training

There are many resources on conditioning for cycling, but for those who need a starting point, here are some considerations.

Long distance and over distance training will improve your aerobic fitness.  Shorter distances on more challenging routes (hills) will increase your strength endurance.  You may also want to develop your neuromuscular system with short drills that focus on your technique.

As you progress your conditioning the training should increase muscular strength and aerobic fitness further, by varying and repeating hill climbs and challenging your goals for the distance work.  In addition you can improve your anaerobic fitness by working with intervals.

Postural Influences

Postural distortion occurs because of the highly flexed position a cyclist is in over a long duration.  This position could effect how efficiently the body produces force.

At 'Functional Health and Performance' we look at structure and movement in order to design programmes that reflect your needs.  To prevent injury, enable greater power output, go for longer durations and at higher intensities, it is essential that you address your needs.  You may need to increase the flexibility of some muscles and improve the strength of others.

Importance of the Core

The core acts as a foundation for power to be produced from.  It is important that cyclists focus attention here as well as typically on the leg muscles.  The stronger it is, the less compensation and work these powerful prime movers (legs) need to do.

Bike Set-Up

As posture is so important then make sure your bike is set up correctly.  If it isn’t and for example your seat is in the wrong position relative to your brake height, this could eventually affect your stability on the bike and therefore your power output.

Rest

If suffering from an injury or struggling to improve performance, then look to your recovery.  This may require attention even before changing training methods or style.  Carefully consider your rest, sleep, nutrition and hydration levels.

With the Cyclone event (www.northernrockcyclone.co.uk) only about one week away, keep your preparation on track and investigate advice on factors such as nutrition, hydration and recovery methods.

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Discussing the Myths of Health and Performance
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Discussing the Myths of Health and Performance

Column #47, 5th July 2008

In a series of fortnightly articles we will discuss the myths and contentious issues that exist in the health and fitness world.  This will contribute to a comprehensive approach to your Health and Performance.  This is your chance to have some input too.  Please email me any questions you have about health, strength and conditioning for sports, nutrition, or any other related topic.

Efficient use of time, money and effort

If you are health conscious you no doubt invest a lot of time, money and effort in trying to achieve the results you are looking for.  In this quest you will be acutely aware of the many sources and angles of information that are available to you.  You are left with the question, what is the best step/approach for me?  The answer to this is key and one thing that stands in your way is poorly placed advice based on health and exercise myths.

Why the Myths?

Where have the myths come from?  Occasionally there is just plain old bad advice, where there is limited or no scientific support for the exercise technique, program design or health advice.  It is unfortunate that we need to get past this stuff to get to the information and practices that really work.

Most of the time however, it is just in the way in which it is applied. It is important that any exercise/health prescription is tailored specifically to the individual.  Specifically taking into account their age, gender, occupation, goals, physiological load, current/past levels of health and performance, stress levels, nutrition and many other factors.  Without appreciating these it is not possible to make a bold statement about whether a certain exercise, program, supplement or approach will work for sure.  It is not a ‘one-size-fits-all’ situation.

Myths to be covered

This is your chance to have some input.  What topics, trends, exercises, and advice do you want some clarity on?  Find out how it relates to you?  Please send me your questions and comments and I’ll be happy to feedback and open them out to discussion.  In addition I will cover topics such as Nutrition, Stretching, training for the Core, Rehabilitation versus Performance training and Isolation versus Integration training.

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Discussing the Myths of Health and Performance: Stretching
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Discussing the Myths of Health and Performance: Stretching

Column #48,19th July 2008

In a series of fortnightly articles we will discuss the myths and contentious issues that exist in the health and fitness world.  This will contribute to a comprehensive approach to your Health and Performance.  Thank you to those who took the opportunity to give some valuable input following the last column.

Getting tied up in knots

As suspected, a major topic of debate is that of stretching.  It is often misunderstood.  The idea that we should stretch for the sake of it being part of a routine is typically detrimental.  It should be carefully programmed, just like any exercise you do.

When your goal is to improve your health and performance, there will be a degree of focus on improving or maintaining your levels of joint mobility.  To build a strong structure that can perform the demands put on it, our bodies need healthy joints that can produce whole-body movement patterns efficiently.

What type of stretching is best?  For how long and how often?  When is the best time to stretch?  All excellent questions and the answer is one of complex-simplicity.  Put simply, it depends.  The stretching technique used to improve mobility of the joints will vary from person to person, sport to sport and across many other factors.

To add complexity to the topic, it really does matter who, why and when.  One type of stretching may be suitable for improving the mobility of one individual, yet be responsible for poor results of another.

The static myth

Key to this discussion is that there is no evidence that static stretching actually increases dynamic performance.  In fact, it could be damaging to some joints.  Considering that we all move dynamically in our daily and athletic activities, this is important to take on board.

Remember that improving joint mobility is specific to you actually performing a controlled movement.  Like being able to bend down to the floor to pick something up, which requires mobility through the ankle, knees, hips, spine and shoulders.  This principle relates to the fact that active flexibility stretching techniques are most likely to be most beneficial.  Your body will be educated into being able to produce the movement successfully.

In short, for sports and especially explosive sports like throwing, stretching must be very carefully considered.  Here the athlete uses a coiled spring like motion to produce power and aimlessly trying to increase a range of motion may inhibit this elastic force.

Myths to be covered

Again, this is your chance to have some input.  What topics, trends, exercises, and advice do you want some clarity on?  Find out how it relates to you?  Please send me your questions and comments and I’ll be happy to feedback and open them out to discussion.

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